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Do you agree that ONLY U.S. Citizens should vote in our elections?

Candidates that pledge to support, cosponsor, and vote for an amendment to clarify that voting in Georgia is the exclusive right of U.S. Citizens

Click here for the full list

James Haygood - US House - District 14 Candidate

Barry Loudermilk - US House - District 11 Candidate

Mike Collins - US House - District 10 Candidate

Rich Robertson - US House - District 2 Candidate

Joyce Griggs - US House - District 1 Candidate

Richard Keener - GA State Senate - District 54 Candidate

Kevin Grindlay - GA State Senate - District 48 Candidate

Curtis Johnson - GA State Senate - District 37 Candidate

David Delk - GA State Senate - District 37 Candidate

Ricky Williams - GA State Senate - District 25 Candidate

Diane Vann - GA State Senate - District 18 Candidate

George Woods - GA State Senate - District 13 Candidate

Orlando Scott - GA State Senate - District 2 Candidate

Richard Townsend - GA State House - District 179 Candidate

Chasity Pawvlik - GA State House - District 164 Candidate

Herbert Franklin - GA State House - District 160 Candidate

William Werkheiser - GA State House - District 157 Candidate

Lethia Kittrell - GA State House - District 156 Candidate

Bethany Ballard - GA State House - District 147 Candidate

Elizabeth Camp - GA State House - District 135 Candidate

William Harris - GA State House - District 126 Candidate

Bruce Bennington - GA State House - District 116 Candidate

John Chan - GA State House - District 97 Candidate

Jenine Milum - GA State House - District 82 Candidate

David Ballard - GA State House - District 74 Candidate

Stoney Mathis - GA State House - District 68 Candidate

Winifred Ahrenkiel - GA State House - District 52 Candidate

Betsy Kramer - GA State House - District 50 Candidate

James Rodi - GA State House - District 41 Candidate

Olivia Angel - GA State Representative - District 39

Lauren McDonalds - GA State House - District 26 Candidate

Carter Barrett - GA State House - District 24 Candidate

Donna Kosicki - GA State House - District 22 Candidate

Jeffrey Richards - GA State House - District 16 Candidate

Norman Gunter - GA State House - District 8 Candidate

Thomas Tarvin - Ga State House - District 2 Candidate

Chris Carr - GA Attorney General Candidate

David Perdue - GA Governor Candidate

Bonnie Rich - GA State House - District 100 Candidate

David Clark - GA State House - District 100 Candidate

Dexter Dawson - GA State House - District 95 Candidate

Mike Coan - GA Commissioner of Labor Candidate

Al Wynn - GA State House - District 153 Candidate

Mary Williams Benefield - GA State House - District 81 Candidate

Alan Powell - GA State House - District 33 Candidate

Nettie B Conner - GA State House - District 144 Candidate

Preston Wren - GA State House - District 106 Candidate

Lisa Kinnemore - GA State House - District 86 Candidate

Dr Demoine Kinney - GA State House - District 92 Candidate

Jill Trammell - GA State House - District 50 Candidate

Kartik Bhatt - GA Commissioner of Labor Candidate

James Coles - GA State House - District 2 Candidate

Butch Miller - GA Lieutenant Governor Candidate

Emory Dunahoo Jr - GA State House - District 31 Candidate

Paul Broun, MD - US House of Representatives - GA District 10 Candidate

Jarad Craig - US House of Representatives - GA District 3 Candidate

Josh Clark - US Senate Candidate - Georgia

Daniela Sullivan Marzahl - GA State Senate - District 25 Candidate

Jayson Stonne - GA State House - District 144 Candidate

Scott Johnson - GA State Senate - District 37 Candidate

Bill Blanchard - GA State House - District 175 Candidate

Neil Wolin - GA State House - District 17 Candidate

Marites R. Redding - GA State House - District 37 Candidate

Lee Coker - GA State House - District 6 Candidate

Wanda Lester-Anthony - GA State House - District 39 Candidate

Barry Sanders - GA State House - District 30 Candidate

Sheri Gilligan - GA State House - District 24 Candidate

 

WHAT IS CITIZEN VOTING?

Most people assume that in order to vote in the United States a person must be a citizen of the United States. However, that isn’t always the case. Federal law requires citizenship in order to vote in a federal election but the law does not apply to state and local elections. Unless a state’s constitution specifically states that only citizens can vote, the possibility of non-citizens legally voting exists.

Cities in Maryland, and California now allow non-citizens to vote in municipal and school board elections because the constitutions in these states are written in such a way to allow cities to determine voter eligibility. Only the constitutions of Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota state that only citizens of the United States are allowed to vote in elections. Every other state is vulnerable to cities allowing non-citizens to vote.

WHY IS CITIZEN VOTING IMPORTANT?

Voting is a fundamental right of citizenship, and four amendments to the Constitution specifically recognize and protect this right, guaranteeing it to citizens of all races and genders and economic means:

  • 15th Amendment: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude.”
  • 19th Amendment: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”
  • 24th Amendment: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.”
  • 26th Amendment: “The right of citizens of the United States, who are 18 years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of age.”

The Constitution never extends this right to noncitizens. Yet in places such as San Francisco and 11 cities in Maryland, noncitizens are voting in local elections. And in San Francisco, those residing here illegally are also being given the vote. 

Legislation has been introduced to allow non-citizens to vote in California, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York and Texas. It’s being considered locally in cities such as Boston, New York City, Portland, Maine, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

A plain reading of the U.S. Constitution and the states’ constitutions leads most people to assume that only citizens can vote but a handful of activist city councils have made it necessary to amend state constitutions to more clearly define voter eligibility. More activist cities will choose to allow non-citizens to vote unless action is taken now.

This is why in the last three years, voters in four states — Alabama (77%), Colorado (63%), Florida (79%) and North Dakota (66%) — have put clear citizen-only voting provisions into their state constitutions.